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Is this genetic? Can I pass it to my children?

Scientists believe that MS is the result of a number of factors rather than a single gene or other agent.  The evidence suggests that genetics play a role in determining a person's susceptibility to MS, but we don’t know what that role is yet. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, in the population at large, the chance of developing MS is less than a tenth of one percent. However, if one person in a family has MS, that person's first-degree relatives (parents, children, and siblings) have a one to three percent chance of getting the disease.   Other factors that come into play may be environmental and/or exposure to certain viruses.  It appears that a combination of factors determines whether someone develops MS.